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Lindt Chocolate Is Suing The Weinstein Company Over $133,000 Golden Globes Party

Lindt Chocolate Is Suing The Weinstein Company Over $133,000 Golden Globes Party


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The cancellation of the troubled film company's awards show party is at the center of the dispute

Paolo_Toffanin / istockphoto.com / Jaguarps / Dreamstime.com

The Swiss chocolatier Lindt & Sprüngli is suing The Weinstein Company after it failed to refund a $133,333 sponsorship for an award show party that never happened. According to the lawsuit, the confectioner agreed to pay the film studio three installments amounting to $400,000 over the course of three Golden Globes events dating back to 2015 — but this year’s event was cancelled.

The movie production company was famous for its star-studded viewing and after parties but that all changed late last year when co-chairman Harvey Weinstein was widely accused of sexual harassment. Until this year, The Weinstein Company had teamed up with Netflix to throw a big ticket party for the Golden Globes, but Netflix terminated the partnership before this year's show.

Prior to this year's Golden Globes and after Oscar-winning producer Weinstein was accused of misconduct, Lindt requested to also revoke its sponsorship. According to the suit, the movie company — which has is known for such critically-acclaimed and box office winning films as Silver Linings Playbook and The King's Speech, and TV productions including Project Runway — acknowledged the breach of contract and promised to reimburse the truffle-maker by the end of December or early January by the latest. In February, Lindt says it followed up on the outstanding payment, but has still has not received it.

“As a result of the above breach, TWC [The Weinstein Company] has caused and is causing Lindt to suffer harm,” the lawsuit reads, “TWC acted deliberately with knowledge of and intent to interfere with Lindt’s rights.”

Lindt — founded in 1845 and best known for Lindor truffles, premium gold Easter bunnies, and luxury Exellence bars — is seeking an undeclared amount in damages

According to The Washington Post, The Weinstein Company recently filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy after talks to sell itself for $275 million fell through.

The Daily Meal has reached out to TWC and Lindt for comment.

For more legal drama, ponder over these restaurants and the wild reasons they were sued.


New York Attorney General ‘Disappointed’ by Collapse of Weinstein Deal

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman expressed disappointment Monday at the collapse of the sale of the Weinstein Co., and defended its decision to intervene in the deal.

In a statement from spokesman Eric Soufer, the attorney general’s office said that the buyers — led by Maria Contreras-Sweet and Ron Burkle — had pledged up to $90 million for victims of Harvey Weinstein’s sexual harassment. If true, that would mark a substantial increase from earlier proposals.

“We are disappointed that despite a clear path forward on those issues — including the buyer’s commitment to dedicate up to $90 million to victim compensation and implement gold-plated HR policies — the parties were unable to resolve their financial differences,” Soufer said.

The Weinstein Co. is now expected to file for bankruptcy and to lay off much of its workforce. The sale collapsed on Sunday night, as the Weinstein Co. board sent a letter blasting the buyers for not pledging to provide for the company’s immediate cash flow needs.

The failure of deal will likely lead to some finger-pointing at the attorney general’s office. Two weeks ago, the parties were close to an agreement when Schneiderman filed a discrimination lawsuit, which sought oversight of the company’s sexual harassment policies and management team.

Since then, Schneiderman said that the office had engaged in “very productive discussions with both parties” about the issues raised in the suit. The statement is careful to pin the reason for the collapse of the sale on “financial differences,” though clearly the attorney general’s intervention delayed the deal, increasing the financial pressure on the Weinstein Co.

“We will continue to pursue justice for victims in the event of the company’s bankruptcy, and our investigation into the pattern of egregious abuse by Harvey Weinstein and his enablers is ongoing,” Soufer said in the statement.


New York Attorney General ‘Disappointed’ by Collapse of Weinstein Deal

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman expressed disappointment Monday at the collapse of the sale of the Weinstein Co., and defended its decision to intervene in the deal.

In a statement from spokesman Eric Soufer, the attorney general’s office said that the buyers — led by Maria Contreras-Sweet and Ron Burkle — had pledged up to $90 million for victims of Harvey Weinstein’s sexual harassment. If true, that would mark a substantial increase from earlier proposals.

“We are disappointed that despite a clear path forward on those issues — including the buyer’s commitment to dedicate up to $90 million to victim compensation and implement gold-plated HR policies — the parties were unable to resolve their financial differences,” Soufer said.

The Weinstein Co. is now expected to file for bankruptcy and to lay off much of its workforce. The sale collapsed on Sunday night, as the Weinstein Co. board sent a letter blasting the buyers for not pledging to provide for the company’s immediate cash flow needs.

The failure of deal will likely lead to some finger-pointing at the attorney general’s office. Two weeks ago, the parties were close to an agreement when Schneiderman filed a discrimination lawsuit, which sought oversight of the company’s sexual harassment policies and management team.

Since then, Schneiderman said that the office had engaged in “very productive discussions with both parties” about the issues raised in the suit. The statement is careful to pin the reason for the collapse of the sale on “financial differences,” though clearly the attorney general’s intervention delayed the deal, increasing the financial pressure on the Weinstein Co.

“We will continue to pursue justice for victims in the event of the company’s bankruptcy, and our investigation into the pattern of egregious abuse by Harvey Weinstein and his enablers is ongoing,” Soufer said in the statement.


New York Attorney General ‘Disappointed’ by Collapse of Weinstein Deal

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman expressed disappointment Monday at the collapse of the sale of the Weinstein Co., and defended its decision to intervene in the deal.

In a statement from spokesman Eric Soufer, the attorney general’s office said that the buyers — led by Maria Contreras-Sweet and Ron Burkle — had pledged up to $90 million for victims of Harvey Weinstein’s sexual harassment. If true, that would mark a substantial increase from earlier proposals.

“We are disappointed that despite a clear path forward on those issues — including the buyer’s commitment to dedicate up to $90 million to victim compensation and implement gold-plated HR policies — the parties were unable to resolve their financial differences,” Soufer said.

The Weinstein Co. is now expected to file for bankruptcy and to lay off much of its workforce. The sale collapsed on Sunday night, as the Weinstein Co. board sent a letter blasting the buyers for not pledging to provide for the company’s immediate cash flow needs.

The failure of deal will likely lead to some finger-pointing at the attorney general’s office. Two weeks ago, the parties were close to an agreement when Schneiderman filed a discrimination lawsuit, which sought oversight of the company’s sexual harassment policies and management team.

Since then, Schneiderman said that the office had engaged in “very productive discussions with both parties” about the issues raised in the suit. The statement is careful to pin the reason for the collapse of the sale on “financial differences,” though clearly the attorney general’s intervention delayed the deal, increasing the financial pressure on the Weinstein Co.

“We will continue to pursue justice for victims in the event of the company’s bankruptcy, and our investigation into the pattern of egregious abuse by Harvey Weinstein and his enablers is ongoing,” Soufer said in the statement.


New York Attorney General ‘Disappointed’ by Collapse of Weinstein Deal

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman expressed disappointment Monday at the collapse of the sale of the Weinstein Co., and defended its decision to intervene in the deal.

In a statement from spokesman Eric Soufer, the attorney general’s office said that the buyers — led by Maria Contreras-Sweet and Ron Burkle — had pledged up to $90 million for victims of Harvey Weinstein’s sexual harassment. If true, that would mark a substantial increase from earlier proposals.

“We are disappointed that despite a clear path forward on those issues — including the buyer’s commitment to dedicate up to $90 million to victim compensation and implement gold-plated HR policies — the parties were unable to resolve their financial differences,” Soufer said.

The Weinstein Co. is now expected to file for bankruptcy and to lay off much of its workforce. The sale collapsed on Sunday night, as the Weinstein Co. board sent a letter blasting the buyers for not pledging to provide for the company’s immediate cash flow needs.

The failure of deal will likely lead to some finger-pointing at the attorney general’s office. Two weeks ago, the parties were close to an agreement when Schneiderman filed a discrimination lawsuit, which sought oversight of the company’s sexual harassment policies and management team.

Since then, Schneiderman said that the office had engaged in “very productive discussions with both parties” about the issues raised in the suit. The statement is careful to pin the reason for the collapse of the sale on “financial differences,” though clearly the attorney general’s intervention delayed the deal, increasing the financial pressure on the Weinstein Co.

“We will continue to pursue justice for victims in the event of the company’s bankruptcy, and our investigation into the pattern of egregious abuse by Harvey Weinstein and his enablers is ongoing,” Soufer said in the statement.


New York Attorney General ‘Disappointed’ by Collapse of Weinstein Deal

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman expressed disappointment Monday at the collapse of the sale of the Weinstein Co., and defended its decision to intervene in the deal.

In a statement from spokesman Eric Soufer, the attorney general’s office said that the buyers — led by Maria Contreras-Sweet and Ron Burkle — had pledged up to $90 million for victims of Harvey Weinstein’s sexual harassment. If true, that would mark a substantial increase from earlier proposals.

“We are disappointed that despite a clear path forward on those issues — including the buyer’s commitment to dedicate up to $90 million to victim compensation and implement gold-plated HR policies — the parties were unable to resolve their financial differences,” Soufer said.

The Weinstein Co. is now expected to file for bankruptcy and to lay off much of its workforce. The sale collapsed on Sunday night, as the Weinstein Co. board sent a letter blasting the buyers for not pledging to provide for the company’s immediate cash flow needs.

The failure of deal will likely lead to some finger-pointing at the attorney general’s office. Two weeks ago, the parties were close to an agreement when Schneiderman filed a discrimination lawsuit, which sought oversight of the company’s sexual harassment policies and management team.

Since then, Schneiderman said that the office had engaged in “very productive discussions with both parties” about the issues raised in the suit. The statement is careful to pin the reason for the collapse of the sale on “financial differences,” though clearly the attorney general’s intervention delayed the deal, increasing the financial pressure on the Weinstein Co.

“We will continue to pursue justice for victims in the event of the company’s bankruptcy, and our investigation into the pattern of egregious abuse by Harvey Weinstein and his enablers is ongoing,” Soufer said in the statement.


New York Attorney General ‘Disappointed’ by Collapse of Weinstein Deal

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman expressed disappointment Monday at the collapse of the sale of the Weinstein Co., and defended its decision to intervene in the deal.

In a statement from spokesman Eric Soufer, the attorney general’s office said that the buyers — led by Maria Contreras-Sweet and Ron Burkle — had pledged up to $90 million for victims of Harvey Weinstein’s sexual harassment. If true, that would mark a substantial increase from earlier proposals.

“We are disappointed that despite a clear path forward on those issues — including the buyer’s commitment to dedicate up to $90 million to victim compensation and implement gold-plated HR policies — the parties were unable to resolve their financial differences,” Soufer said.

The Weinstein Co. is now expected to file for bankruptcy and to lay off much of its workforce. The sale collapsed on Sunday night, as the Weinstein Co. board sent a letter blasting the buyers for not pledging to provide for the company’s immediate cash flow needs.

The failure of deal will likely lead to some finger-pointing at the attorney general’s office. Two weeks ago, the parties were close to an agreement when Schneiderman filed a discrimination lawsuit, which sought oversight of the company’s sexual harassment policies and management team.

Since then, Schneiderman said that the office had engaged in “very productive discussions with both parties” about the issues raised in the suit. The statement is careful to pin the reason for the collapse of the sale on “financial differences,” though clearly the attorney general’s intervention delayed the deal, increasing the financial pressure on the Weinstein Co.

“We will continue to pursue justice for victims in the event of the company’s bankruptcy, and our investigation into the pattern of egregious abuse by Harvey Weinstein and his enablers is ongoing,” Soufer said in the statement.


New York Attorney General ‘Disappointed’ by Collapse of Weinstein Deal

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman expressed disappointment Monday at the collapse of the sale of the Weinstein Co., and defended its decision to intervene in the deal.

In a statement from spokesman Eric Soufer, the attorney general’s office said that the buyers — led by Maria Contreras-Sweet and Ron Burkle — had pledged up to $90 million for victims of Harvey Weinstein’s sexual harassment. If true, that would mark a substantial increase from earlier proposals.

“We are disappointed that despite a clear path forward on those issues — including the buyer’s commitment to dedicate up to $90 million to victim compensation and implement gold-plated HR policies — the parties were unable to resolve their financial differences,” Soufer said.

The Weinstein Co. is now expected to file for bankruptcy and to lay off much of its workforce. The sale collapsed on Sunday night, as the Weinstein Co. board sent a letter blasting the buyers for not pledging to provide for the company’s immediate cash flow needs.

The failure of deal will likely lead to some finger-pointing at the attorney general’s office. Two weeks ago, the parties were close to an agreement when Schneiderman filed a discrimination lawsuit, which sought oversight of the company’s sexual harassment policies and management team.

Since then, Schneiderman said that the office had engaged in “very productive discussions with both parties” about the issues raised in the suit. The statement is careful to pin the reason for the collapse of the sale on “financial differences,” though clearly the attorney general’s intervention delayed the deal, increasing the financial pressure on the Weinstein Co.

“We will continue to pursue justice for victims in the event of the company’s bankruptcy, and our investigation into the pattern of egregious abuse by Harvey Weinstein and his enablers is ongoing,” Soufer said in the statement.


New York Attorney General ‘Disappointed’ by Collapse of Weinstein Deal

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman expressed disappointment Monday at the collapse of the sale of the Weinstein Co., and defended its decision to intervene in the deal.

In a statement from spokesman Eric Soufer, the attorney general’s office said that the buyers — led by Maria Contreras-Sweet and Ron Burkle — had pledged up to $90 million for victims of Harvey Weinstein’s sexual harassment. If true, that would mark a substantial increase from earlier proposals.

“We are disappointed that despite a clear path forward on those issues — including the buyer’s commitment to dedicate up to $90 million to victim compensation and implement gold-plated HR policies — the parties were unable to resolve their financial differences,” Soufer said.

The Weinstein Co. is now expected to file for bankruptcy and to lay off much of its workforce. The sale collapsed on Sunday night, as the Weinstein Co. board sent a letter blasting the buyers for not pledging to provide for the company’s immediate cash flow needs.

The failure of deal will likely lead to some finger-pointing at the attorney general’s office. Two weeks ago, the parties were close to an agreement when Schneiderman filed a discrimination lawsuit, which sought oversight of the company’s sexual harassment policies and management team.

Since then, Schneiderman said that the office had engaged in “very productive discussions with both parties” about the issues raised in the suit. The statement is careful to pin the reason for the collapse of the sale on “financial differences,” though clearly the attorney general’s intervention delayed the deal, increasing the financial pressure on the Weinstein Co.

“We will continue to pursue justice for victims in the event of the company’s bankruptcy, and our investigation into the pattern of egregious abuse by Harvey Weinstein and his enablers is ongoing,” Soufer said in the statement.


New York Attorney General ‘Disappointed’ by Collapse of Weinstein Deal

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman expressed disappointment Monday at the collapse of the sale of the Weinstein Co., and defended its decision to intervene in the deal.

In a statement from spokesman Eric Soufer, the attorney general’s office said that the buyers — led by Maria Contreras-Sweet and Ron Burkle — had pledged up to $90 million for victims of Harvey Weinstein’s sexual harassment. If true, that would mark a substantial increase from earlier proposals.

“We are disappointed that despite a clear path forward on those issues — including the buyer’s commitment to dedicate up to $90 million to victim compensation and implement gold-plated HR policies — the parties were unable to resolve their financial differences,” Soufer said.

The Weinstein Co. is now expected to file for bankruptcy and to lay off much of its workforce. The sale collapsed on Sunday night, as the Weinstein Co. board sent a letter blasting the buyers for not pledging to provide for the company’s immediate cash flow needs.

The failure of deal will likely lead to some finger-pointing at the attorney general’s office. Two weeks ago, the parties were close to an agreement when Schneiderman filed a discrimination lawsuit, which sought oversight of the company’s sexual harassment policies and management team.

Since then, Schneiderman said that the office had engaged in “very productive discussions with both parties” about the issues raised in the suit. The statement is careful to pin the reason for the collapse of the sale on “financial differences,” though clearly the attorney general’s intervention delayed the deal, increasing the financial pressure on the Weinstein Co.

“We will continue to pursue justice for victims in the event of the company’s bankruptcy, and our investigation into the pattern of egregious abuse by Harvey Weinstein and his enablers is ongoing,” Soufer said in the statement.


New York Attorney General ‘Disappointed’ by Collapse of Weinstein Deal

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman expressed disappointment Monday at the collapse of the sale of the Weinstein Co., and defended its decision to intervene in the deal.

In a statement from spokesman Eric Soufer, the attorney general’s office said that the buyers — led by Maria Contreras-Sweet and Ron Burkle — had pledged up to $90 million for victims of Harvey Weinstein’s sexual harassment. If true, that would mark a substantial increase from earlier proposals.

“We are disappointed that despite a clear path forward on those issues — including the buyer’s commitment to dedicate up to $90 million to victim compensation and implement gold-plated HR policies — the parties were unable to resolve their financial differences,” Soufer said.

The Weinstein Co. is now expected to file for bankruptcy and to lay off much of its workforce. The sale collapsed on Sunday night, as the Weinstein Co. board sent a letter blasting the buyers for not pledging to provide for the company’s immediate cash flow needs.

The failure of deal will likely lead to some finger-pointing at the attorney general’s office. Two weeks ago, the parties were close to an agreement when Schneiderman filed a discrimination lawsuit, which sought oversight of the company’s sexual harassment policies and management team.

Since then, Schneiderman said that the office had engaged in “very productive discussions with both parties” about the issues raised in the suit. The statement is careful to pin the reason for the collapse of the sale on “financial differences,” though clearly the attorney general’s intervention delayed the deal, increasing the financial pressure on the Weinstein Co.

“We will continue to pursue justice for victims in the event of the company’s bankruptcy, and our investigation into the pattern of egregious abuse by Harvey Weinstein and his enablers is ongoing,” Soufer said in the statement.