Traditional recipes

DIY Caramelized Onion Hummus

DIY Caramelized Onion Hummus

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients:
1 large white onion
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 15-ounce can of chickpeas
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 tablespoons tahini
tip: peanut butter can also be used as a substitute
1 garlic clove, peeled and minced
1/4 cup olive oil
1/2 teaspoon of salt

Photo by Casey Carr

Directions

1. Not sure how to properly peel and cut an onion? This might help.

Photo by Casey Carr

2. Pour 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a sauté pan with diced onion and cook over high heat until transparent, about 4-5 minutes. Stir occasionally.

Photo by Casey Carr

3. Reduce heat and allow to cook until caramelized, about 10 minutes.

Photo by Casey Carr

4. While the onion is cooking, mince the garlic and rinse beans.

Photo by Casey Carr

5. Place the garbanzo beans, olive oil, tahini and garlic into a food processor. You can allow the caramelized onion to cool, or you can do what I do and just pour them right into the food processor to make slightly warm hummus.

Photo by Casey Carr

6. Blend together.

Photo by Casey Carr

7. Keep blending. It will look like this.

Photo by Casey Carr

8. And after a short time (about 2 minutes), it will look like this. Add the lemon juice and salt to the mixture.

Photo by Casey Carr

9. Scoop creamy contents out of the processor, top with leftover caramelized onions and enjoy.

Photo by Casey Carr

View the original post, DIY Caramelized Onion Hummus, on Spoon University.

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Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus

Hummus has become a dinner party staple. It’s funny to think that 10 years ago I had never tried it, and now everyone I know seems to have a tub or two of hummus in their fridge at all times. Even though grocery stores stock a wide variety of hummus flavors, making homemade hummus is worth the extra effort.

Charles came up with the idea of Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus. He had bought some recently and decided that it is his favorite hummus flavor, and I thought it would be fun to recreate it for a small dinner party we were throwing. And luckily, he loved my version.

I used a mix of balsamic vinegar reduction and balsamic vinegar straight out of the bottle. I wanted to reduce some of the vinegar to get the balsamic vinegar flavor without thinning out the hummus. I did add a few tablespoons of balsamic vinegar from the bottle to taste per Charles’s suggestion.

The reason why this hummus takes an hour to make is that you can’t rush the process of caramelizing onions. You need to go slow and keep the temperature low to get perfectly golden onions. It’s worth the extra time.


Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus

Hummus has become a dinner party staple. It’s funny to think that 10 years ago I had never tried it, and now everyone I know seems to have a tub or two of hummus in their fridge at all times. Even though grocery stores stock a wide variety of hummus flavors, making homemade hummus is worth the extra effort.

Charles came up with the idea of Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus. He had bought some recently and decided that it is his favorite hummus flavor, and I thought it would be fun to recreate it for a small dinner party we were throwing. And luckily, he loved my version.

I used a mix of balsamic vinegar reduction and balsamic vinegar straight out of the bottle. I wanted to reduce some of the vinegar to get the balsamic vinegar flavor without thinning out the hummus. I did add a few tablespoons of balsamic vinegar from the bottle to taste per Charles’s suggestion.

The reason why this hummus takes an hour to make is that you can’t rush the process of caramelizing onions. You need to go slow and keep the temperature low to get perfectly golden onions. It’s worth the extra time.


Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus

Hummus has become a dinner party staple. It’s funny to think that 10 years ago I had never tried it, and now everyone I know seems to have a tub or two of hummus in their fridge at all times. Even though grocery stores stock a wide variety of hummus flavors, making homemade hummus is worth the extra effort.

Charles came up with the idea of Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus. He had bought some recently and decided that it is his favorite hummus flavor, and I thought it would be fun to recreate it for a small dinner party we were throwing. And luckily, he loved my version.

I used a mix of balsamic vinegar reduction and balsamic vinegar straight out of the bottle. I wanted to reduce some of the vinegar to get the balsamic vinegar flavor without thinning out the hummus. I did add a few tablespoons of balsamic vinegar from the bottle to taste per Charles’s suggestion.

The reason why this hummus takes an hour to make is that you can’t rush the process of caramelizing onions. You need to go slow and keep the temperature low to get perfectly golden onions. It’s worth the extra time.


Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus

Hummus has become a dinner party staple. It’s funny to think that 10 years ago I had never tried it, and now everyone I know seems to have a tub or two of hummus in their fridge at all times. Even though grocery stores stock a wide variety of hummus flavors, making homemade hummus is worth the extra effort.

Charles came up with the idea of Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus. He had bought some recently and decided that it is his favorite hummus flavor, and I thought it would be fun to recreate it for a small dinner party we were throwing. And luckily, he loved my version.

I used a mix of balsamic vinegar reduction and balsamic vinegar straight out of the bottle. I wanted to reduce some of the vinegar to get the balsamic vinegar flavor without thinning out the hummus. I did add a few tablespoons of balsamic vinegar from the bottle to taste per Charles’s suggestion.

The reason why this hummus takes an hour to make is that you can’t rush the process of caramelizing onions. You need to go slow and keep the temperature low to get perfectly golden onions. It’s worth the extra time.


Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus

Hummus has become a dinner party staple. It’s funny to think that 10 years ago I had never tried it, and now everyone I know seems to have a tub or two of hummus in their fridge at all times. Even though grocery stores stock a wide variety of hummus flavors, making homemade hummus is worth the extra effort.

Charles came up with the idea of Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus. He had bought some recently and decided that it is his favorite hummus flavor, and I thought it would be fun to recreate it for a small dinner party we were throwing. And luckily, he loved my version.

I used a mix of balsamic vinegar reduction and balsamic vinegar straight out of the bottle. I wanted to reduce some of the vinegar to get the balsamic vinegar flavor without thinning out the hummus. I did add a few tablespoons of balsamic vinegar from the bottle to taste per Charles’s suggestion.

The reason why this hummus takes an hour to make is that you can’t rush the process of caramelizing onions. You need to go slow and keep the temperature low to get perfectly golden onions. It’s worth the extra time.


Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus

Hummus has become a dinner party staple. It’s funny to think that 10 years ago I had never tried it, and now everyone I know seems to have a tub or two of hummus in their fridge at all times. Even though grocery stores stock a wide variety of hummus flavors, making homemade hummus is worth the extra effort.

Charles came up with the idea of Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus. He had bought some recently and decided that it is his favorite hummus flavor, and I thought it would be fun to recreate it for a small dinner party we were throwing. And luckily, he loved my version.

I used a mix of balsamic vinegar reduction and balsamic vinegar straight out of the bottle. I wanted to reduce some of the vinegar to get the balsamic vinegar flavor without thinning out the hummus. I did add a few tablespoons of balsamic vinegar from the bottle to taste per Charles’s suggestion.

The reason why this hummus takes an hour to make is that you can’t rush the process of caramelizing onions. You need to go slow and keep the temperature low to get perfectly golden onions. It’s worth the extra time.


Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus

Hummus has become a dinner party staple. It’s funny to think that 10 years ago I had never tried it, and now everyone I know seems to have a tub or two of hummus in their fridge at all times. Even though grocery stores stock a wide variety of hummus flavors, making homemade hummus is worth the extra effort.

Charles came up with the idea of Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus. He had bought some recently and decided that it is his favorite hummus flavor, and I thought it would be fun to recreate it for a small dinner party we were throwing. And luckily, he loved my version.

I used a mix of balsamic vinegar reduction and balsamic vinegar straight out of the bottle. I wanted to reduce some of the vinegar to get the balsamic vinegar flavor without thinning out the hummus. I did add a few tablespoons of balsamic vinegar from the bottle to taste per Charles’s suggestion.

The reason why this hummus takes an hour to make is that you can’t rush the process of caramelizing onions. You need to go slow and keep the temperature low to get perfectly golden onions. It’s worth the extra time.


Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus

Hummus has become a dinner party staple. It’s funny to think that 10 years ago I had never tried it, and now everyone I know seems to have a tub or two of hummus in their fridge at all times. Even though grocery stores stock a wide variety of hummus flavors, making homemade hummus is worth the extra effort.

Charles came up with the idea of Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus. He had bought some recently and decided that it is his favorite hummus flavor, and I thought it would be fun to recreate it for a small dinner party we were throwing. And luckily, he loved my version.

I used a mix of balsamic vinegar reduction and balsamic vinegar straight out of the bottle. I wanted to reduce some of the vinegar to get the balsamic vinegar flavor without thinning out the hummus. I did add a few tablespoons of balsamic vinegar from the bottle to taste per Charles’s suggestion.

The reason why this hummus takes an hour to make is that you can’t rush the process of caramelizing onions. You need to go slow and keep the temperature low to get perfectly golden onions. It’s worth the extra time.


Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus

Hummus has become a dinner party staple. It’s funny to think that 10 years ago I had never tried it, and now everyone I know seems to have a tub or two of hummus in their fridge at all times. Even though grocery stores stock a wide variety of hummus flavors, making homemade hummus is worth the extra effort.

Charles came up with the idea of Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus. He had bought some recently and decided that it is his favorite hummus flavor, and I thought it would be fun to recreate it for a small dinner party we were throwing. And luckily, he loved my version.

I used a mix of balsamic vinegar reduction and balsamic vinegar straight out of the bottle. I wanted to reduce some of the vinegar to get the balsamic vinegar flavor without thinning out the hummus. I did add a few tablespoons of balsamic vinegar from the bottle to taste per Charles’s suggestion.

The reason why this hummus takes an hour to make is that you can’t rush the process of caramelizing onions. You need to go slow and keep the temperature low to get perfectly golden onions. It’s worth the extra time.


Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus

Hummus has become a dinner party staple. It’s funny to think that 10 years ago I had never tried it, and now everyone I know seems to have a tub or two of hummus in their fridge at all times. Even though grocery stores stock a wide variety of hummus flavors, making homemade hummus is worth the extra effort.

Charles came up with the idea of Caramelized Onion and Balsamic Vinegar Hummus. He had bought some recently and decided that it is his favorite hummus flavor, and I thought it would be fun to recreate it for a small dinner party we were throwing. And luckily, he loved my version.

I used a mix of balsamic vinegar reduction and balsamic vinegar straight out of the bottle. I wanted to reduce some of the vinegar to get the balsamic vinegar flavor without thinning out the hummus. I did add a few tablespoons of balsamic vinegar from the bottle to taste per Charles’s suggestion.

The reason why this hummus takes an hour to make is that you can’t rush the process of caramelizing onions. You need to go slow and keep the temperature low to get perfectly golden onions. It’s worth the extra time.


Watch the video: Καραμελωμένα κρεμμύδια Candied onions (December 2021).